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for: Surface Albedo Modification

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The long-term effect of increasing the albedo of urban areas

Author(s): Akbari H, Matthews HD, Seto D

Published: April, 2012

Publisher: Environmental Research Letters

DOI: 10.1088/1748-9326/7/2/024004

Tags: Surface Albedo Modification, Environmental Side-Effects, Climate Modelling

URL: http://iopscience.iop.org/1748-9326/7/2/024004/

Abstract: Solar reflective urban surfaces (white rooftops and light-colored pavements) can increase the albedo of an urban area by about 0.1. Increasing the albedo of urban and human settlement areas can in turn decrease atmospheric temperature and could potentially offset some of the anticipated temperature increase caused by global warming. We have simulated the long-term (decadal to centennial) effect of increasing urban surface albedos using a spatially explicit global climate model of intermediate complexity. We first carried out two sets of simulations in which we increased the albedo of all land areas between ±20° and ±45° latitude respectively. The results of these simulations indicate a long-term global cooling effect of 3 × 10−15 K for each 1 m2 of a surface with an albedo increase of 0.01. This temperature reduction corresponds to an equivalent CO2 emission reduction of about 7 kg, based on recent estimates of the amount of global warming per unit CO2 emission. In a series of additional simulations, we increased the albedo of urban locations only, on the basis of two independent estimates of the spatial extent of urban areas. In these simulations, global cooling ranged from 0.01 to 0.07 K, which corresponds to a CO2 equivalent emission reduction of 25–150 billion tonnes of CO2.


Bright is the new black—multi-year performance of high-albedo roofs in an urban climate

Author(s): Gaffin SR, Imhoff M, Rosenzweig C, Khanbilvardi R, Pasqualini A, Kong AYY, Grillo D, Freed A, Hillel D, Hartung E

Published: March, 2012

Publisher: Environmental Research Letters

DOI: 10.1088/1748-9326/7/1/014029

Tags: Surface Albedo Modification

URL: http://iopscience.iop.org/1748-9326/7/1/014029/

Abstract: High-albedo white and cool roofing membranes are recognized as a fundamental strategy that dense urban areas can deploy on a large scale, at low cost, to mitigate the urban heat island effect. We are monitoring three generic white membranes within New York City that represent a cross section of the dominant white membrane options for US flat roofs: (1) an ethylene–propylene–diene monomer (EPDM) rubber membrane; (2) a thermoplastic polyolefin (TPO) membrane; and (3) an asphaltic multi-ply built-up membrane coated with white elastomeric acrylic paint. The paint product is being used by New York City's government for the first major urban albedo enhancement program in its history. We report on the temperature and related albedo performance of these three membranes at three different sites over a multi-year period. The results indicate that the professionally installed white membranes are maintaining their temperature control effectively and are meeting the Energy Star Cool Roofing performance standards requiring a three-year aged albedo above 0.50. The EPDM membrane shows evidence of low emissivity; however this had the interesting effect of avoiding any 'winter heat penalty' for this building. The painted asphaltic surface shows high emissivity but lost about half of its initial albedo within two years of installation. Given that the acrylic approach is such an important 'do-it-yourself', low-cost, retrofit technique, and, as such, offers the most rapid technique for increasing urban albedo, further product performance research is recommended to identify conditions that optimize its long-term albedo control. Even so, its current multi-year performance still represents a significant albedo enhancement for urban heat island mitigation.


Effects of Urban Surfaces and White Roofs on Global and Regional Climate

Author(s): Jacobson MZ, ten Hoeve JE

Published: February, 2012

Publisher: Journal of Climate

DOI: 10.1175/JCLI-D-11-00032.1

Tags: Surface Albedo Modification, Climate Modelling

URL: http://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/abs/10.1175/JCLI-D-11-00032.1

Abstract: Land use, vegetation, albedo, and soil-type data are combined in a global model that accounts for roofs and roads at near their actual resolution to quantify the effects of urban surface and white roofs on climate. In 2005, ~0.128% of the earthrsquo;s surface contained urban land cover, half of which was vegetated. Urban land cover was modeled over 20 years to increase gross global warming (warming before cooling due to aerosols and albedo change are accounted for) by 0.06–0.11 K and population-weighted warming by 0.16–0.31 K, based on two simulations under different conditions. As such, the urban heat island (UHI) effect may contribute to 2%–4% of gross global warming, although the uncertainty range is likely larger than the model range presented, and more verification is needed. This may be the first estimate of the UHI effect derived from a global model while considering both UHI local heating and large-scale feedbacks. Previous data estimates of the global UHI, which considered the effect of urban areas but did not treat feedbacks or isolate temperature change due to urban surfaces from other causes of urban temperature change, imply a smaller UHI effect but of similar order. White roofs change surface albedo and affect energy demand. A worldwide conversion to white roofs, accounting for their albedo effect only, was calculated to cool population-weighted temperatures by ~0.02 K but to warm the earth overall by ~0.07 K. White roof local cooling may also affect energy use, thus emissions, a factor not accounted for here. As such, conclusions here regarding white roofs apply only to the assumptions made.


Climatic effects of surface albedo geoengineering

Author(s): Irvine PJ, Ridgwell A, Lunt DJ

Published: December, 2011

Publisher: Journal of Geophysical Research

DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016281

Tags: Surface Albedo Modification, Climate Modelling, Precipitation

URL: http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2011/2011JD016281.shtml

Abstract: Various surface albedo modification geoengineering schemes such as those involving desert, urban, or agricultural areas have been proposed as potential strategies for helping counteract the warming caused by greenhouse gas emissions. However, such schemes tend to be inherently limited in their potential and would create a much more heterogeneous radiative forcing than propositions for space-based "reflectors" and enhanced stratospheric aerosol concentrations. Here we present results of a series of atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (GCM) simulations to compare three surface albedo geoengineering proposals: urban, cropland, and desert albedo enhancement. We find that the cooling effect of surface albedo modification is strongly seasonal and mostly confined to the areas of application. For urban and cropland geoengineering, the global effects are minor but, because of being colocated with areas of human activity, they may provide some regional benefits. Global desert geoengineering, which is associated with significant global-scale changes in circulation and the hydrological cycle, causes a smaller reduction in global precipitation per degree of cooling than sunshade geoengineering, 1.1% K -1 and 2.0% K -1 respectively, but a far greater reduction in the precipitation over land, 3.9% K -1 compared with 1.0% K -1. Desert geoengineering also causes large regional-scale changes in precipitation with a large reduction in the intensity of the Indian and African monsoons in particular. None of the schemes studied reverse the climate changes associated with a doubling of CO 2, with desert geoengineering profoundly altering the climate and with urban and cropland geoengineering providing only some regional amelioration at most.


Bright water: hydrosols, water conservation and climate change

Author(s): Seitz R

Published: December, 2011

Publisher: Climatic Change

DOI: 10.1007/s10584-010-9965-8

Tags: Surface Albedo Modification

URL: http://www.springerlink.com/content/672772206p58k1wr/

Abstract: Because air–water and water–air interfaces are equally refractive, cloud droplets and microbubbles dispersed in bodies of water reflect sunlight in much the same way. The lifetime of sunlight-reflecting microbubbles, and hence the scale on which they may be applied, depends on Stokes Law and the influence of ambient or added surfactants. Small bubbles backscatter light more efficiently than large ones, opening the possibility of using highly dilute micron-radius hydrosols to substantially brighten surface waters. Such microbubbles can noticeably increase water surface reflectivity, even at volume fractions of parts per million and such loadings can be created at an energy cost as low as J m − 2 to initiate and mW m − 2 to sustain. Increasing water albedo in this way can reduce solar energy absorption by as much as 100 W m − 2, potentially reducing equilibrium temperatures of standing water bodies by several Kelvins. While aerosols injected into the stratosphere tend to alter climate globally, hydrosols can be used to modulate surface albedo, locally and reversibly, without risk of degrading the ozone layer or altering the color of the sky. The low energy cost of microbubbles suggests a new approach to solar radiation management in water conservation and geoengineering: Don’t dim the Sun; Brighten the water.


Albedo enhancement over land to counteract global warming: impacts on hydrological cycle

Author(s): Bala G, Nag B

Published: November, 2011

Publisher: Climate Dynamics

DOI: 10.1007/s00382-011-1256-1

Tags: Surface Albedo Modification, Afforestation, Land Use Management, Precipitation, Climate Modelling

URL: https://www.see.ed.ac.uk/~shs/Climate%20change/Climate%20model%20results/Bala_and_Nag_CD2011.pdf

Abstract: A recent modelling study has shown that precipitation and runoff over land would increase when the reflectivity of marine clouds is increased to counter global warming. This implies that large scale albedo enhancement over land could lead to a decrease in runoff over land. In this study, we perform simulations using NCAR CAM3.1 that have implications for Solar Radiation Management geoengineering schemes that increase the albedo over land. We find that an increase in reflectivity over land that mitigates the global mean warming from a doubling of CO2 leads to a large residual warming in the southern hemisphere and cooling in the northern hemisphere since most of the land is located in northern hemisphere. Precipitation and runoff over land decrease by 13.4 and 22.3%, respectively, because of a large residual sinking motion over land triggered by albedo enhancement over land. Soil water content also declines when albedo over land is enhanced. The simulated magnitude of hydrological changes over land are much larger when compared to changes over oceans in the recent marine cloud albedo enhancement study since the radiative forcing over land needed (-8.2 W m-2) to counter global mean radiative forcing from a doubling of CO2 (3.3 W m-2) is approximately twice the forcing needed over the oceans (-4.2 W m-2). Our results imply that albedo enhancement over oceans produce climates closer to the unperturbed climate state than do albedo changes on land when the consequences on land hydrology are considered. Our study also has important implications for any intentional or unintentional large scale changes in land surface albedo such as deforestation/afforestation/reforestation, air pollution, and desert and urban albedo modification.


Controlling the Earth's albedo using reflective hollow glass spheres

Author(s): Walter AGN

Published: July, 2011

Publisher: International Journal of Global Environmental Issues

DOI: 10.1504/IJGENVI.2011.043508

Tags: Surface Albedo Modification

URL: http://www.inderscience.com/search/index.php?action=record&rec_id=43508

Abstract: Volcanic eruptions have been found to cool the Earth's atmosphere by ejecting dust into the atmosphere. It should be possible to mimic this effect by designing a substitute for this dust consisting of buoyant reflective glass bubbles. This substitute will form a more efficient and long lasting sunscreen. This paper describes the design of such glass bubbles, and the implications and constraints imposed by the choice of materials. It shows the proposal is technically and economically feasible, controllable, of limited lifespan, and environmentally neutral. Actual development and testing will be needed to determine some of the parameters involved. It is clear the idea can be developed and tested experimentally for a very low initial outlay in cost and resources.


Bubble, bubble, toil and trouble

Author(s): Robock A

Published: February, 2011

Publisher: Climatic Change

DOI: 10.1007/s10584-010-0017-1

Tags: Surface Albedo Modification, Environmental Side-Effects

URL: http://www.springerlink.com/content/a2483012335351x0/

Abstract: Seitz (2011) has proposed using micron-size bubbles in water to increase albedo and cool the water as an alternative to geoengineering in the stratosphere using sulfate aerosols. The slogan “Don’t dim the Sun; Brighten the water” appears twice in the paper. Seitz suggests that cooling oceanic regions this way would be a safer way to address the problem of global warming. The problem of global warming is real and potentially very dangerous (IPCC 2007). Society has various options for responding to this problem, nothing (the response so far), mitigation (reducing or eliminating emissions of greenhouse gases that are causing the warming—the far preferable option), adaptation and suffering in response to the warming and other climate impacts that are already happening and will grow in the future, and geoengineering. Geoengineering here will refer to “solar radiation management” attempts to reduce absorbed solar radiation to counteract the warming. Carbon capture and storage is also sometimes called geoengineering, but it has completely different ethical, risk, governance, and cost issues and will not be addressed here.


Can crop albedo be increased through the modification of leaf trichomes, and could this cool regional climate?

Author(s): Doughty CE, Field CB, McMillan AMS

Published: November, 2010

Publisher: Climatic Change

DOI: 10.1007/s10584-010-9936-0

Tags: Surface Albedo Modification, , Climate Modelling

URL: http://www.springerlink.com/content/311r7qj46046481u/

Abstract: Managing the land surface to increase albedo to offset regional warming has received less attention than managing the land surface to sequester carbon. We test whether increasing agricultural albedo can cool regional climate. We first used the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM 3.0) coupled to the Community Land Model (CLM 3.0) to assess the broad climatic effects of a hypothetical implementation of a strategy in which the albedo of cropland regions is increased using high albedo crops. Simulations indicate that planting brighter crops can decrease summertime maximum daily 2 m air temperature by 0.25°C per 0.01 increase in surface albedo at high latitudes (>30°). However, planting brighter crops at low latitudes (<30°) may have negative repercussions including warming the land surface and decreasing precipitation, because increasing the land surface albedo tends to preferentially decrease latent heat fluxes to the atmosphere, which decreases cloud cover and rainfall. We then test a possible method for increasing crop albedo by measuring the range of albedo within 16 isolines of soybeans that differ only with trichome color, orientation, and density but find that such modifications had only minor impacts on leaf albedo. Increasing agricultural albedo may cool high latitude regional climate, but increasing plant albedo sufficiently to offset potential future warming will require larger changes to plant albedo than are currently available.


Can oceanic foams limit global warming?

Author(s): Evans J, Stride E, Edirisinghe M, Andrews D, Simons R

Published: July, 2010

Publisher: Climate Research

DOI: 10.3354/cr00885

Tags: Surface Albedo Modification

URL: http://www.int-res.com/abstracts/cr/v42/n2/p155-160/

Abstract: When the diverse methods proposed for solar radiation management are surveyed, a relatively simple, environmentally acceptable, double-acting mechanism for increasing the earth’s albedo emerges. It is a low-level environmental intervention that enhances a mechanism already active in nature by increasing the foam fraction of the ocean surface. Bubble rafts increase the optical reflectivity of the ocean and when bubbles burst, they launch seasalt particles that loft and increase the number concentration of cloud droplets in the marine boundary layer, thus increasing the reflectivity of stratocumulus. A strategy based on recent research for producing microbubbles appears to be the best option for large-scale use.


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